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Scotland: Creative Nation, Cultural Summit

Impact | Innovation | Participation

Day 1 – The Impact of the Arts

Chair - Brian Taylor
Political Editor, BBC Scotland

 
Provocateur - Gerry Hassan
Associate of Demos

 

Cultural Summit; Photo: Richard Campbell

Programme for Day 1 (doc) |  Cultural Summit downloads 
(Provocateur's blog

Morning

Opening Address
Linda Fabiani MSP
Minister for Europe, External Affairs and Culture

Keynote
‘A Creative Cultural Policy for Scotland’
John Knell
Co-founder of Intelligence Agency

Performance
'She was a knife thrower's assistant'
Caroline Bowditch
performance artist and choreographer

Breakouts:

Keynote Up Close
John Knell
Anne Bonnar
Transition Director, Creative Scotland

Creative Conversations
Discussion groups
Miles Harrison

Seminars

Public Value and the Arts
Catherine Bunting
Director of Research
Arts Council England

Adding to the Menu of Funding Possibilities
David Carrington
Independent consultant
Mission Models Money

World Tourism, Future Trends and Cultural Capital
Ian Yeoman
Scenario Planner
VisitScotland

See Analyze and Create: Film and Education in Sweden
Per Ericsson
Swedish Film Institute

The Role of Museums in National Identity
Jane Carmichael
Director of Collections
National Museums Scotland

On the Ground

Pathfinders: Levers for Increased Confidence
Kathleen O’Neill
Cultural Planner
Clackmannanshire Council

Quality Framework
Morag Arnot
Director of Planning and Communications
Scottish Arts Council
Susan Hay
Scottish Arts Council

Participative Arts Workshops

' Making Words Move '
Caroline Bowditch
performance artist and choreographer

Word of Mouth
Mark Thomson
poet

 

Afternoon

KeynoteDebate

The Excellence Debate
Joyce McMillan
Theatre Critic and Commentator for The Scotsman
(chair) 

Sir Brian McMaster
Former Director
Edinburgh International Festival

Mark Cousins
filmmaker, author and curator

Vicky Featherstone
Artistic Director
National Theatre of Scotland

Janet Smith
Artistic Director
Scottish Dance Theatre

Performance

Kharabat
Afghan musicians

Breakouts

Keynote Up Close (notes .doc)
Sir Brian McMaster

Provocateur Mystery Tour: Gerry Hassan has Left the Building
Gerry Hassan

Other breakouts are repeated as the morning

Session Outlines

Keynote Up Close
John Knell
Anne Bonnar

In this one off session John interviews Transition Director Anne Bonnar about progress towards Creative Scotland

Creative Conversations
Miles Harrison

On each day of the Summit Miles Harrison will be facilitating ‘Creative Conversations’.  These will be opportunities for delegates to be creative, subversive, counter intuitive, provocative and to have their say on the theme of the day:

  • Highlight and discuss ‘what’s not on the agenda’ - but should be!
  • Discuss the issues you feel a creative nation should be addressing
  • Use Creative Conversations to test and develop your ideas

Miles will be using a variety of facilitation techniques
 
Delegates wishing to have their voice heard in a Creative Conversation can email their thoughts in advance to Cultural summit - tell us what you really think!

Public Value and the Arts
Catherine Bunting

This seminar will consider the outcomes of the arts debate, Arts Council England’s first public value inquiry. It will examine research findings on public attitudes to the arts and their funding, and set out a possible new framework for articulating and evaluating cultural value.  It will also explore whether and how cultural agencies can respond to public expectations of trust, accountability and involvement in decision-making processes.

See, Analyze and Create: Film and Education in Sweden
Per Ericsson

This session will look at the Swedish experience and structure in the field of moving image education. This includes supporting young filmmaking as well as maintaining a broad repertoire for films aimed at children as well as developing the integration of film and media education into the school curriculum.  And maintaining a vital repertoire for the Swedish municipalities School cinema programmes.

Through a networking structure, consisting of regional film centres and municipalities, the Swedish Film Institute has been able to support and inspire more and more of the local school authorities to take responsibility for the implementation of a local plan for moving image education. One vital part of these plans has been to emphasize the importance of not ignoring the cultural expressions of the young but to explore their media-world as well. Just as they stress that it's important not just to learn about the audio-visual medium but to learn through it.

http://www.dvoted.net/

World Tourism, Future Trends and Cultural Capital
What does this mean for Scotland as a Creative Nation?
Ian Yeoman

Ian, VisitScotland’s crystal ball gazer, takes you on a journey through the trends that could shape the cultural capital of destinations, and stimulate your thinking about the future
 
From a tourism perspective, culture is a key driver of destination choice and activity, as consumers distinguish themselves through the consumption of culture.  What is the role of tourism in celebrating the creation of that culture and does the cultural sector welcome its influence?  Ian provides an insightful and thought-provoking overview of future trends, shaped around the concepts creativity, culture and tourism.  A panel of arts, cultural and tourism professionals will then discuss and debate the implications of these trends and the shared opportunities the future presents.

Adding to the Menu of Funding Possibilities
David Carrington

An introduction to the potential for using New and Alternative Financial Instruments. David will talk about working with Missions Models Money (MMM) on their plans to help develop a wider understanding of the potential income spectrum for the arts and cultural sector.

The Role of Museums in National Identity
Jane Carmichael

Museums can both reflect and accentuate national culture and sense of identity.  Traditionally seen as repositories of a nation’s treasures, and essentially passive reflectors, a closer analysis demonstrates their capacity for a more active and engaged role with their audience. The explosion in the late twentieth century in the number of museums begs the question why?
This session will look at different examples of the kind of role available for museums, ranging from contributions to international diplomacy to definitions of nationhood.

Pathfinders: Levers for Increased Confidence
Kathleen O’Neill

This session will examine ‘creative confidence’ as a language the same throughout nations.

The session will look at creative confidences being developed within Clackmannanshire – namely through the Pathfinder process. This includes local agendas of cultural planning fed by residents within a framework of informed choice and includes international networking. The session will also consider academic strategic partnership towards regeneration of a post industrial township – including Glasgow and Edinburgh Schools of Art.

Work by Kenny Bean, Artist in Residence (and creative evaluator) from the Pathfinder will be incorporated into a short practical exercise that will involve the group in creating a real link with a European partner – leaving participants with the ‘permission’ and ‘contacts’ to follow up this learning (and the rest of the summit) with a real project of their own.

Quality Framework
Morag Arnot
Susan Hay

This session will look at the history and development of artistic evaluation within the Scottish Arts Council and will seek debate and discussion from participants on the challenges for the future and how to develop a effective system for artistic evaluation for the 21st century.

Making Words Move
Caroline Bowditch

This practical workshop will allow participants to experience some of the choreographic techniques that Caroline uses to create movement and choreography from text.  Participants are encouraged to bring along any words that they would like to move to.

Word of Mouth
Mark Thomson

Mark will ask delegates to discover how to use their own language and dialect and create pieces of writing that have real personal resonance.  The session will encourage playing about with the words and potentially creating something of lasting value. Mark invites delegates to ‘come and find your voice’.

The Excellence Debate

Inspired by the recent publication of Sir Brian McMaster’s report to the Department for Culture Media and Sport  (DCMS), ‘Supporting Excellence in the Arts – From Measurement to Judgement’ this one-off session will engender lively debate around the theme of excellence

'Provocateur Mystery Tour: Gerry Hassan has Left the Building'
Gerry Hassan

Put yourself in Gerry's hands for an hour and a half of exploring the city as well as the Cultural Summit and its themes.   In a one to one/intimate group, this is an opportunity to tell him what you really think - what more could a delegate ask for...?

Biographies

Brian Taylor
Gerry Hassan
Linda Fabiani
John Knell
Miles Harrison
Catherine Bunting
Per Ericsson
David Carrington
Jane Carmichael

   

Anne Bonnar
Mark Cousins
Ian Yeoman
Kathleen O’Neill
Morag Arnot
Caroline Bowditch
Mark Thomson
Vicky Featherstone
Janet Smith

Brian Taylor - Chair

Brian TaylorBrian Taylor is Political Editor for BBC Scotland. He joined the BBC in 1985.  After a spell co-presenting the political programme Left, Right and Centre, he was appointed Political Correspondent and then Political Editor.  In this role he covers Scottish politics for all outlets, including BBC Scotland and UK network programmes.  In addition, he has presented Good Morning Scotland and is a regular contributor to other BBC programmes.

Before joining the BBC, he worked in newspapers for eight years including six years as a lobby correspondent at Westminster.

Brian is a published writer and has lectured on politics and identity in Washington, Stockholm, Madrid, Edinburgh, London and throughout Germany.

Gerry Hassan - Provocateur

Gerry Hassan

Gerry Hassan is a writer, researcher, policy analyst and commentator, who has worked on a range of Scottish, UK and international subjects. He has worked on many books about Scottish and UK politics, including

        • 'The Dreaming City: Glasgow 2020'
        • 'Power of Mass Imagination' (2007)
        • 'Scotland 2020: Hopeful Stories for a Northern Nation' (2005)
        • The Political Guide to Modern Scotland (2004)
        • 'The Scottish Labour Party: History, Institutions and Ideas' (2004)
        • 'After Blair: Politics after the New Labour Decade' (2006)

Forthcoming publications by Gerry will be looking at the nature of the contemporary SNP in government, the state of Scottish Labour, the changing character of the UK and in a break from the above an exploration of post-war Scotland, working class culture and the meaning of football. Recent research by Gerry has included

  • the next twenty years of the United Kingdom
  • the emerging thinking and track record of Gordon Brown
  • Britishness and how this informs government policy

Gerry is also commissioning and editing a special issue of the ideas journal Renewal on arts and culture, covering such subjects as how do we speak about the arts, the meaning of creativity and innovation, a critique of Richard Florida, and the rise and fall of cultural Britishness.

Gerry has headed up two aclaimed Demos programmes - Scotland 2020 and Glasgow 2020. Glasgow 2020 was a 'mass imagination' project - which used the idea of the stories people tell to examine different futures – and what was also a ‘futures literacy’ project – addressing how we can democratise the future and involve as many people as possible in shaping and deciding the future.

Gerry runs a twice yearly weekend at The Ceilidh Place, Ullapool called Changin' Scotland - which aims to bring together organisations and individuals for constructive dialogue, music and film that nurtures change - and the idea of having a good time (the next one: March 14th-16th 2008).

Gerry works with a range of artists and cultural practioners on ideas of how the arts can inform policy. Recently he worked with Suspect Culture on their revue ‘Futurology’ and has been a key contributor to numerous bodies including the Centre for Confidence and Well-Being and the Scottish Parliament’s Futures Forum. Gerry has also supported ideas and discussion via commissioning, publishing and publicising a range of authors – notably;

  • 'The Scots’ Crisis of Confidence' by Carol Craig
  • a new edition of 'The Break-Up of Britain' by Tom Nairn
  • a critique of the knowledge economy by Paul Thompson.

He is a regular commentator in the Scottish and UK media, speaker at events in Scotland, UK and internationally, an Associate Editor of the journal Renewal and an Honorary Research Fellow at Glasgow Caledonian University.

Linda Fabiani MSP - opening address

Linda Fabiani MSPLinda was born in Glasgow in 1956. She attended Hyndland Secondary School and then Napier College in Edinburgh where she achieved a SHND in Secretarial Studies. In 1988 she furthered her education at Glasgow University where she graduated with a Diploma in Housing Studies.

Linda worked in social housing for nearly 20 years, with her most recent post being Director of East Kilbride Housing Association. In 1999 she was elected to the Scottish Parliament as a Central Scotland MSP. Among other roles, Linda was Convener of the European and External Relations Committee, Convener of the Cross-Party Group on Refugees and Asylum Seekers and Convener of the Cross-Party International Development Group. On her re-election at the May 2007 election she was appointed Minister for Europe, External Affairs and Culture.

John Knell - Keynote Speaker

John Knell

John Knell is one of the UK's leading thinkers on the changing face of work and organisations and is co-founder of Intelligence Agency.

John has worked with a wide range of corporate clients, including Microsoft, Tesco, Astra Zeneca, Eversheds, Lloyds TSB, Manpower, and Siemens. Intelligence Agency’s current clients include Arts Council England East Creative Scotland, Demos, The Independent Theatre Council, NESTA, Suffolk Constabulary, UK Film Council, and WhiteLoop for Edexcel.

John’s recent client work has ranged across high level public policy work particularly in the arts and cultural sphere, strategic reviews and strategy development, thought leadership development, top team facilitation, executive advice and support, and a wide range of public speaking and event facilitation activities. Current and recent client work includes:

  • Intellectual and policy input into Arts Council England’s public value inquiry
  • Developing a provocation narrative about the future of theatre for the Independent Theatre Council
  • Designing an international research project on the future of Vocational and Educational Training for Edexcel
  • Developing a provocation narrative about the future of film for the UK Film Council
  • Strategy development for the Board and Director of Creative Scotland
  • Developing a new forward business case for Western Australian Ballet
  • two week residency (November 2007) in Perth on the invitation of the Western Australian Government to work with all of the funded cultural organisations in the region on their forward strategy
  • A lead investigator (working with Alan Blackwell and his team from Cambridge University) on a new £80K research project funded by NESTA exploring interdisciplinary innovation.
  • lead rapporteur for a Demos project on skills and the UK labour market funded by City and Guilds and is co-author of their recently published provocation ‘Confronting the skills paradox’

In terms of recent thought leadership work undertaken by John - a think piece commissioned by Mission, Models, Money – entitled ‘The Art of Living’ exploring what a more intelligent arts funding system might look like was published in March 2007;  He was involved in the design and delivery of a thinking seminar series for Creative London on the future of London as the world’s creative hub, which lead to the recently published provocation ‘London’s Creative Economy: An Accidental Success?’, co-authored with Kate Oakley; and in 2006 Arts Council England published John’s think piece, entitled ‘Whose Art Is it Anyway? The report explores whether personalisation and choice are going to transform the future trajectory of the arts in the United Kingdom.

Prior to launching Intelligence Agency, John was Director of Research and Advocacy at The Work Foundation, where he played a key role in transforming that organisation into an authority on work issues. His writings on the impact of the new economy on the labour market have been instrumental in shaping emerging attitudes to employee relations, and he has authored numerous reports on work, organisational change, and public policy.

John is a regular contributor to the Top Management Programme for senior civil servants run by the Cabinet Office, and is also a frequent public speaker and media commentator on workplace and public policy issues.

Vicky Featherstone

Vicky Featherstone, Photo: Christopher BowerVicky is the first Artistic Director and Chief Executive of the National Theatre of Scotland. She was appointed in November 2004 and launched the company with HOME in February 2006.

Vicky studied Drama at Manchester University and furthered her education there by doing an MA in Directing in association with The Contact Theatre. After leaving University Vicky worked as Script Editor for Central TV before becoming an Assistant Director on RTYDS at the West Yorkshire Playhouse with Jude Kelly. During this time, she brought several successful productions to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Following this Vicky was Resident Director at the Bolton Octagon and worked at Northern Stage, Newcastle. She then became Associate Director for the Bush Theatre before being drawn back into TV first at the BBC and then at United TV and Drama where she developed several highly successful long-running TV dramas.

Vicky became Artistic Director of Paines Plough in 1997 and ran the new writing company until her departure for Scotland to set up NTS. While at Paines Plough she was responsible for setting up the still running Wild Lunch season with Sarah Kane and This Other England, a dynamic programme of work asking the best contemporary playwrights to look at the use of the English language and identity. She also worked with some of our leading playwrights and was responsible for putting Paines Plough back on the theatrical map. 

Janet Smith

Janet Smith, Photo: Mike DavidsonJanet has created 5 works for Scottish Dance Theatre since 1997 – ‘Playfall’, ‘Song of Songs’, ‘Still’, ‘Highland’ and ‘Forty Minutes’, re-staged ‘Chiaroscuro’ and ‘Touching Zulu’ and co-directed ‘Monkey’, a successful collaboration with Dundee Rep Ensemble.

Janet began her training at Dartington College of Arts and then studied and worked in the US before forming Janet Smith & Dancers, touring nationally and internationally for over 12 years.  She worked as a freelance performer with LCDT and Rosemary Butcher (amongst others) and has choreographed for internationally renowned companies including The Playhouse Company (South Africa), Batsheva (Israel), Cisne Negra (Brazil) and Dance Theatre of Freiburg (Germany).

Janet has created children’s works for English National Ballet and also worked in opera and theatre including the RSC.

Sir Brian McMaster

Sir Brian McMaster, Photo: Douglas Robertson
Former Director
Edinburgh International Festival

 

 

 

 

Mark Cousins

Mark Cousins, Scottish FreakMark was born and brought up in Northern Ireland.  As a boy he fell in love with Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, le Corbusier, and the Pauls Cezanne and Weller. He studied film and media at the University of Stirling, then made documentary films on neo-Nazism, the Gulf War,and Ian Hamilton Finlay, for British TV.  In the mid 90s he became Director of, and rethought, the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Since then he has been artistic director or guest curator to, or advisor on, festivals on Chinese, African and Iranian film and music, in the UK, Mexico, Brazil, Sarajevo (during the siege) and Canada. He says that festivals should be authored as films and books are. Cousins' first book, ‘Imagining Reality’, was a history of documentary film, co-edited with Kevin Macdonald.  His latest, ‘The Story of Film’, a history of creativity in cinema, was published around the world.  The Times reviewer called it "by far and away the best film book I've ever read".

He has contributed chapters to books on Martin Scorsese, Roman Polanksi, Asian Cinema and Terrence Malick.  His new book - on cinema beyond Hollywood - will be called ‘Watching Real People Elsewhere’ and might cause a stooshie.  Cousins was a TV presenter for five years - he devised and directed BBC2's ‘Scene by Scene’ and co-curated and fronted that channel's ‘Moviedrome’. The Times reviewer wrote of his onscreen appearances, "Cousins has the figure of a knitting needle."  He has been asked to be an advisor to Martin Scorsese's World Cinema Foundation.

He is currently making a six hour documentary history of innovation in cinema; writing what Irvine Welsh called "a dirty realism anti-Brigadoon musical"; and runs 4Way Pictures with Antonia Bird, Robert Carlyle and Irvine Welsh. Their films ‘The Meat Trade’ and ‘The Man Who Walks’, an adaptation of the Alan Warner novel, starring Billy Connolly, are in pre-production. 

Cousins plans to make a film about inspiration, and being 8 1/2, with Tilda Swinton. He once drove to India from Edinburgh, has taught at many of Scotland's universities, and lectured on trauma, grief, visual thinking and childhood. He co-established the charity Scottish Kids are Making Movies.

Anne Bonnar 

As Transition Director, Anne will work closely with the Joint Board of the Scottish Arts Council and Scottish Screen to lead and manage the project to establish the new cultural development body, Creative Scotland. 

The project will include the development of the vision for the new organisation and recommending methods of operation that will best enable Creative Scotland to deliver its objectives.

Anne has over 30 years experience of working in the cultural sector, both nationally and internationally. Previous roles include General Manager of the Traverse and Chair of the Federation of Scottish Theatre, before going on to co-found international arts management consultancy Bonnar Keenlyside, where she specialises in leading major change, organisational development and recovery projects.

Anne has a strong passion for the arts and culture and has also devoted time and expertise over the last few years as a director of the National Theatre of Scotland, and trustee of the National Galleries of Scotland.

Miles Harrison

Miles is an independent meeting facilitator and organisation development consultant.  He has particular expertise and experience in the cultural sector in managing change, board development, leadership and governance.

He previously worked for the leadership development organisation Common Purpose as Programme Director between 2002 and 2006 where he opened and developed the new Mid Scotland office. He moved to Scotland in the summer of 1998 and began work for the Scottish Arts Council as Senior Development Officer (National Lottery).  In April 2000 he became the manager of the SAC Lottery funded Advancement Programme - a scheme to help organisations achieve lasting positive change. 

Previously Miles was Head of Arts Business Services at Yorkshire Arts Board where his work included all areas of management and marketing development for those who work in the arts. Other positions have include working with a commercial tour operator, business advisor in Liverpool for 4 years, a Marketing Manager for the Sherman Theatre in Cardiff & Theatre Clwyd in Mold and Director of the Arts Business Centre at the University of Lincolnshire and Humberside.  Miles has run many training courses in business planning, management and marketing.  

He is currently the Vice Chair of the Macrobert Arts Centre Committee.

Catherine Bunting

Catherine Bunting is Director of Research at Arts Council England, where she leads a team of researchers to explore the role of the arts in national life and the opportunities and challenges for public funding of the arts.

Catherine leads the arts debate, the Arts Council England’s first public value inquiry, and is an active member of the project group for Taking Part, a national survey of cultural participation led by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport . Prior to joining the Arts Council England, Catherine established the research department at Arts & Business and developed a programme of work to explore the relationship between the arts and the private sector.  She spent a number of years overseas and has worked as a researcher for the Australia Business Arts Foundation. She has a Master's in Applied Statistics and began her career as a statistician in a software development company. 

Per Ericsson

Per Ericsson is a member of the Children & Youth department at the Swedish Film Institute. He is in charge of developing film education in Swedish municipalities and the regional networks of media educators in Sweden. Before working for the Swedish Film Institute Per Ericsson was the head of ‘Film I Öst’, one of the 19 regional film centres in Sweden.  Per Ericsson has Master degrees in Media and Culture studies from the University of Linköping.

David Carrington

David is an independent consultant working with charities, companies and the government on the funding and governance of charities and social enterprises. His clients have included the Treasury, the first Venture Philanthropy ‘pooled’ fund in the UK, The Big Lottery Fund, the European Foundation Centre and many endowed and corporate foundations in the UK. David also works as a ‘mentor/adviser’ for senior staff of several charities and has a joint venture (‘On Board’) with the law firm Bates, Wells & Braithwaite on the governance of charities.

He has been Chief Executive of three foundations including The Baring Foundation (1992-8).

He is Chair of engage (the association of people working in gallery education) and of Allavida, a founder Director of the Trust that publishes the journal Alliance, and a Trustee of the National Foundation for Youth Music and the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. He is also a member of the Social Investment Task Force and the Commission on Unclaimed Assets. He chairs the editorial group of the Philanthropy UK e-newsletter.

Jane Carmichael

Jane Carmichael joined National Museums Scotland in the newly created post of Director of Collections in July 2003.  She is now responsible for the huge range of collections there which include the history of technology, social history, the natural sciences, archaeology, the decorative arts and the history of Scotland. Last year, she led the Picasso – Fired with Passion exhibition team and is currently engaged with the exhibitions: Silver: Made in Scotland, Scotland and Scotland: A Changing Nation..  Her previous career was with the Imperial War Museum, London where she specialised in the history of photography. Her book First World War Photographers (1988) identified the photographers and organisation of British and Imperial photography for the first time.

Ian Yeoman

Ian Yeoman is VisitScotland's crystal ball gazer responsible for science fiction, reality, innovation and alternative thinking. Ian and his team in the last year have being involved a wide spectrum of projects from the future of space travel, technology trends and economic forecasts for 2008. Ian has a PhD in Managemet Science from Napier University, is a Honorary Professor of Tourism Management at Stirling University and author of several book. His new book, Tomorrows Tourist is published by Elsevier in March 2008.

Kathleen O’Neill

Kathleen has been based in Scotland for 24 years with a career that has made a strong contribution to profiling creativity as a tool for educational, personal and social development in Scotland and parts of Europe. Kathleen’s work includes national and international networked programmes involving professional artists, arts & heritage organisations, educators and environmental planners. Lifelong learning, social inclusion, and regeneration agendas, as well as capital and revenue fund raising, have been the core of this work.

While currently Cultural Planner with Clackmannanshire Council, Kathleen previously worked as a freelance educator and consultant for nationally and internationally known organisations. As a trained artist Kathleen’s commitment to cultural development is fed from grassroots experience and working partnerships that have inspired many other creative practitioners and funding bodies in Scotland.

Morag Arnot

A graduate of Edinburgh University with an MA in psychology, Morag initially trained as a Careers Officer working in schools and colleges around West Edinburgh before being appointed as a lecturer in Careers Guidance at the University of Paisley.

After five years and gaining a MSc in HR from Strathclyde University, she worked in the Scottish Enterprise network before returning to Paisley University. There she worked initially as a project manager, developing and researching access to higher education for disadvantaged groups and then as Director of Continuing Education at the university’s Ayr campus.
After a period of restructuring at Paisley she was promoted to the role of Director of Corporate Communication. After gaining a post graduate qualification in Marketing, Morag was appointed in 1999 as Director of Marketing at Napier University. 

Morag joined the Scottish Arts Council in January 2005 where she is Director of Planning and Communications.

Caroline Bowditch

Caroline majored in performing arts for her Education degree (1990). She has been dancing in mixed ability companies for 15 years since arriving in the UK in 2002.   Caroline has been mentored by Adam Benjamin, CandoCo and Yael Flexer (Bedlam Dance). She has participated in several residencies with CandoCo and was a participant in The Dancers Project 2005 (The Place). 

Caroline was one of five disabled choreographers undergoing training on the Cultural Shift project 2005 (East London Dance) and was one of 22 artists invited to be part of Colina 2006 (Collaboration in Arts) where she choreographed a new piece "Staircase" which involved sending choreographic
directions to 8 dancers via text message throughout the piece.

Caroline has choreographed and performed work as girl jonah with Fiona Wright (including showing at British Dance Edition 2006, Dance Umbrella 2006).  She was commissioned to produce a site
specific piece for Trafalgar Square as part of the Liberty Festival, and performed in new work for Scottish Dance Theatre (Spring 2007 tour).

Caroline is also a founder member of Weave Movement Theatre (Melbourne) and The FATHoM Project (Newcastle)

Mark Thomson

Mark Thomson is a freelance creative writing and poetry teacher and works nationally across Scotland with often vulnerable children or young adults at risk of exclusion from society.  Passionate about the Scots language and his own Dundonian dialect he demonstrates to others how to find, use and be proud of their own thoughts, words and identity. He encourages people to place themselves at the centre of their own learning and take inspiration from their own experiences.

 

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